Andy Wirth’s Take On The Extreme California Drought

The Olympic Valley on the north shore of Lake Tahoe is home to the Squaw Valley Ski Resort, a world renowned winter wonderland and one of the most picturesque ski locations on the planet.

The leading force behind the ski resort is none other than Andy Wirth, the CEO of Squaw Valley, who has had many years experience within this industry having started out at a young age as wilderness ranger following up in his grandfathers foot steps. For this very reason Andy Wirth knows how unpredictable the environment can be. Learn more about Andy Wirth: http://squawalpine.com/explore/blog/andy-wirth-elected-chairman-reno-tahoe-regional-air-service-corporation and www.kcrw.com/people/andy-wirth

This is true for the recent environmental challenges that the state of California have had to face. They have been subjected to one of the most severe droughts in the history of the country which has impacted various sectors of the economy including tourism which is what Andy Wirth and his team at the Squaw Valley Ski Resort are apart of.

For them the drought has not been as significant as most people believe it to be. Unfortunately, according to Andy Wirth, the media has amplified the drought issue and therefore people believe that there is not much skiing and or winter sports to be enjoyed.

All this was shared on the recent radio program, Press Play with Madeleine Brand on KCRW radio which I heard by chance in my car. The interview paints a very good picture of some of the struggles he resort industry have had to face as well as some of the measures they are implementing to combat the biggest issue.

This is the production of snow. Snow fall in total has not been as successful as in previous years however a good time is still to be had according to Andy Wirth.

He believes his partners in the south would agree with him. Even though only two thirds of the area have adequate snow, this is still more than enough to enjoy winter sports to their full potential.

Researchers of Stanford University believe that the overall climate of the area will be changing over the next decade and residents will see less rainfall and snow.

For this very reason it is important to consider a mind set shift when it comes to what profit potential offerings the resorts will have to provide in order to make up for the loss during the winter months.

Andy Wirth believes there are still many years of good skiing to be had and the industry is well adapted so he does not see a need to worry just yet. The necessary know how and equipment is available to make up for the slight loss in quantity of snow.